Is Banking Deregulation Starting to Work ?

Ed Mills, a Washington policy analyst at Raymond James, answers some of the most frequent questions swirling around the deregulation discussion working its way through Congress, the changing face of the Fed and other hot-button issues within the banking industry.

Q: You see the policy stars aligning for financials – what do you mean?
The bank deregulatory process anticipated following the 2016 election is underway. The key personnel atop the federal banking regulators are being replaced, the Board of Governors at the Federal Reserve is undergoing a near total transformation, and Congress is set to make the most significant changes to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act since its passage. This deregulatory push, combined with the recently enacted tax changes, will likely result in increased profitability, capital return, and M&A activity for many financial services companies.

Perhaps no regulator has been more impactful on the implementation of the post-crisis regulatory infrastructure than the Federal Reserve. As six of seven seats on the board of governors change hands, this represents a sea change for bank regulation.

We are also anticipating action on a bipartisan Senate legislation to increase the threshold that determines if an institution is systemically important – or a SIFI institution – on bank holding companies from $50 billion to $250 billion, among other reforms.

Q: Can you expand on why Congress is changing these rules?
Under existing law, banks are subject to escalating levels of regulation based upon their asset size. Key thresholds include banks at $1 billion, $10 billion, $50 billion and $250 billion in assets. These asset sizes may seem like really large numbers, but are only a fraction of the $1 trillion-plus held by top banks. There have been concerns in recent years that these thresholds are too low and have held back community and regional banks from lending to small businesses, and have slowed economic growth.

Responding to these concerns, a bipartisan group in the Senate is advocating a bill that would raise the threshold for when a bank is considered systemically important and subjected to increased regulations. The hope among the bill’s advocates is that community and regional banks would see a reduction in regulatory cost, greater flexibility on business activity, increased lending, and a boost to economic growth.

The bill recently cleared the Senate on a 67-31 vote, and is now waiting for the House to pass the bill and the two chambers to then strike a deal that sends it to the president’s desk.

Q: What changes do you expect on the regulatory side with leadership transitions?
In the coming year, we expect continued changes to the stress testing process for the largest banks (Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review, known as CCAR), greater ability for banks to increase dividends, and changes to capital, leverage and liquidity rules.

We expect the Fed will shift away from regulation to normalization of the fed funds rate. This could represent a multi-pronged win for the banking industry: normalized interest rates, expanded regulatory relief, increased business activity and lower regulatory expenses.

Another key regulator we’re watching is the CFPB (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau), which under Director Richard Cordray pursued an aggressive regulatory agenda for banks. With White House Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney assuming interim leadership, the bureau is re-evaluating its enforcement mechanisms. Additionally, Dodd-Frank requires review of all major rules within five years of their effective dates, providing an opportunity for the Trump-appointed director to make major revisions.

Q: We often hear concerns that the rollback of financial regulations put in place to prevent a repeat of one financial crisis will lead to the next. Are we sowing the seeds of the next collapse?
There is little doubt the lack of proper regulation and enforcement played a strong role in the financial crisis. The regulatory infrastructure put in place post-crisis has undoubtedly made the banking industry sounder. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell recently testified before Congress that the deregulatory bill being considered will not impact that soundness.

Q: In your view, what kind of political developments will have effects on markets?
We are keeping our eyes on the results of the increase in trade-related actions and the November midterms. The recent announcement on tariffs raises concerns of a trade war and presents a potentially significant headwind for the economy. The market may grow nervous over a potential changeover in the House and or Senate majorities, but it could also sow optimism on the ability to see a breakthrough on other legislative priorities.

 

Source: https://www.bankdirector.com/index.php/issues/regulation/deregulation-promise-beginning-bear-fruit/

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